Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood
Artist Focus
25 views
25 views

Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood

Louisa Hunt - April 25, 2018
59 Views

Tuition fees to rise and debts will double for university students

The Browne report has recommended that the government lift the cap on tuition fees in his review released last Tuesday. The announcement was then followed by a statement given by Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, Vince Cable, saying that the government are likely to set the cap at £7,000 a year.

Future university students are facing much higher debt levels after graduating

Lord Browne, who formerly held the position of chief executive at oil giant BP, said that universities should be allowed to choose how much they charge. He went on to say that those universities who charged the highest fees will have to widen their access to students from poorer families with measures such as scholarships for living expenses.

The report also stated that universities that did charge over £6,000 a year would have to pay an increasing percentage levy for every £1,000 more they charged. This means that a university who charged £6,000 a year would be able to keep 100 percent of their tuition fees.
If the university chose to charge £7,000 a year though, they would only be able to keep 94 percent and a university who charged £10,000 a year would only keep 81 percent.

Cameron Tait, the President of the University of Sussex Students’ Union, said: “Lord Browne’s review is as disappointing as it is regressive. The Union vehemently opposes the report and the lifting of the cap, which is simply a thin veil for the expected swingeing government cuts to Higher Education.”

Lord Browne defended his decisions by claiming that “there is a lot of evidence that students don’t just look at debt, but at the prize at the end as well, which is significant earning potential. If you look at the 40 percent of students who study part-time, we don’t offer them anything, but they still come and study part-time.”

 In what may be considered slightly better news to some students, the report also suggested that graduates should be asked to start repaying their loans after they start earning £21,000 instead of £15,000, which is currently the case.
NUS have been ardent in their opposition of any rise in tuition fees.

On Tuesday, Aaron Porter, President of the National Union of Students (NUS), said: “There is no clear assurance that a hike in fees would improve student choice or quality and the evidence since fees tripled four years ago shows that neither student satisfaction nor quality has improved.”

This report could mean debts upwards of £30,000 for graduates. One third-year student said, “I’m disgusted. If the fees had been that high when I applied I may still have chosen to go to university but there’s absolutely no way I could have left home to do it.”

Shortly after the report was released, Vince Cable delivered his statement in the commons. He confirmed that the government would follow the direction laid out in the report but would only raise the cap to £7,000 for the meantime.

His statement has caused a lot of controversy amongst Liberal Democrats, who made a pledge before the election not to remove the cap. A number of Cable’s party have now declared their intentions to vote against the Government’s package. The Students’ Union has said it will lobby local Liberal Democrat MPs for their support.

The Labour party has so far been reluctant to take a hyper-critical line considering their new Shadow Chancellor was the minister responsible for introducing tuition fees in the first place. This coupled with the government’s majority should see the plans pass though the commons with ease.

This has not stopped some politicians show their support for students though. Brighton Pavilion MP and Britain’s only Green MP, Caroline Lucas, said “The Browne review is simply a bid to shift the cost of education away from the state and onto the student. It will mean our public degrees will be among the most costly in the world. Many people will be priced out of going to university. A free market in tuition fees can only increase inequality.”

Students opposed to the new plans have been invited to take part in a national demonstration organised by the NUS and the University and College Union (UCU) in London on the 10 November.

Get the best viral stories straight into your inbox!

Don't worry, we don't spam
Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood
Artist Focus
25 views
25 views

Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood

Louisa Hunt - April 25, 2018
Artist Focus: Maayan Cohen
Artist Focus
24 views
24 views

Artist Focus: Maayan Cohen

Emma Phillips - April 24, 2018
Voodoo enthralls at The Old Market – review
Arts
30 views
30 views

Voodoo enthralls at The Old Market – review

Ricardo Reverón Blanco - April 24, 2018
24 views

Trial & error: Sex, sass and foolishness through dance

Ricardo Reverón Blanco - April 24, 2018

Leave a Reply

Join the Badger Team

Apply today!

Latest Posts

Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood
Artist Focus
25 views
Artist Focus
25 views

Artist Focus: Rory Hinshelwood

Louisa Hunt - April 25, 2018

Rory Hinshelwood studies Zoology with Spanish at Sussex. His brand is called Poplar St., at the moment the brand sell embroidered high-quality t-shirts. Rory works mostly in graphics…

Artist Focus: Maayan Cohen
Artist Focus
24 views
Artist Focus
24 views

Artist Focus: Maayan Cohen

Emma Phillips - April 24, 2018

The Badger spoke with Sussex University’s Maayan Cohen about her creative workshop, ‘Bits and Pieces.’ Can you tell us a bit about Bits and Pieces- what’s the…

Voodoo enthralls at The Old Market – review
Arts
30 views
Arts
30 views

Voodoo enthralls at The Old Market – review

Ricardo Reverón Blanco - April 24, 2018

As part of South East Dance’s micro-festival, Undisciplined, Voodoo comes to being as a collaboration between South East Dance and Project O. Project O brings artists Alexandrina…

Arts
24 views

Trial & error: Sex, sass and foolishness through dance

Ricardo Reverón Blanco - April 24, 2018

For the concluding show of South East Dance’s micro-festival, Double Bill brings two short performances to The Old Market’s stage: Comebacks I thought of later by Eleanor…

An evening with Candoco Dance Company – review
Arts
36 views
Arts
36 views

An evening with Candoco Dance Company – review

Georgia Grace - April 24, 2018

Last week at the Attenborough Centre, the phenomenally unique and refreshing dance company Candoco brought to the stage a double bill of performances exploring identity, community and…

Jake Bugg at Brighton Dome
Arts
58 views
Arts
58 views

Jake Bugg at Brighton Dome

Matthew Nicholls - April 19, 2018

Following the release of his Fourth Studio album ‘Hearts that Strain’ in September 2017, Jake Bugg decided he wanted an intimate tour, and that is exactly what…

Should Instrumental Skill Still Matter?
Arts
83 views
Arts
83 views

Should Instrumental Skill Still Matter?

Rob Smith - April 19, 2018

I am not advocating that all music, no matter how little talent is required, is by default innovative. I will eagerly admit that much of the bland,…

Sussex student takes show to Brighton Fringe
Arts
85 views
Arts
85 views

Sussex student takes show to Brighton Fringe

Georgia Grace - April 18, 2018

  Final year English and Drama student Sophie Pester will be taking her original stage show A Glass Half Empty to Brighton Fringe next month. First performed…

What’s wrong with the literary canon?
Arts
74 views
Arts
74 views

What’s wrong with the literary canon?

Shiri Reuben - April 18, 2018

This elusive and slightly archaic category, 'the literary canon' seeps into what we know and what we think we know about 'good' and 'bad' literature. On a simple…

For students, where does work end and rest begin?
Features
99 views
Features
99 views

For students, where does work end and rest begin?

Lucy Pegg - April 17, 2018

Print Production Editor Lucy Pegg examines the difficult balance between work and rest for students. In an environment that blurs the line between productivity and recreation, can…

Cambridge Analytica: did Facebook share your personal data?
Science
77 views
Science
77 views

Cambridge Analytica: did Facebook share your personal data?

Luke Richards - April 14, 2018

The last couple of weeks have been tough for Facebook, as it reels from the public scrutiny it has received over its lackadaisical protection of personal data.…

Brighton Fringe comic Joseph Morpurgo on satire, Frankenstein and his fictitious nine-hour, one-man show
Arts
116 views
Arts
116 views

Brighton Fringe comic Joseph Morpurgo on satire, Frankenstein and his fictitious nine-hour, one-man show

Georgia Grace - April 13, 2018

At The Badger we sat down with multi-talented comic, three-time Chortle Award winner and Edinburgh Fringe favourite Joseph Morpurgo to discuss his show Hammerhead. Following a three-week…

Amritsar: 99 years later and still no apology
Comment
139 views
Comment
139 views

Amritsar: 99 years later and still no apology

William Singh - April 12, 2018

99 years ago on Friday, one British general marched his soldiers into an enclosed garden in the vicinity of the holy Golden Temple and sealed off the…

Talking disability, identity and inclusion through dance – Candoco preview
Arts
123 views
Arts
123 views

Talking disability, identity and inclusion through dance – Candoco preview

Georgia Grace - April 12, 2018

Candoco are a company of disabled and non-disabled dancers who, for the past 25 years, have challenged ideas about what dance can be and who gets to…

Voodoo preview
Arts
83 views
Arts
83 views

Voodoo preview

Ricardo Reverón Blanco - April 12, 2018

“[A] science fiction that addresses the desire, confusion and responsibility felt as individuals, who are also symbols of many long-persecuted people.” (Quoted from Alexandrina Hemsley and Jamila…

Interview with Chris Watson: Take a trip to No Man’s Land this spring
Lifestyle
163 views
Lifestyle
163 views

Interview with Chris Watson: Take a trip to No Man’s Land this spring

Louisa Streeting - April 6, 2018

Sound recordist, Chris Watson, spoke to The Badger about his new installation piece featured in the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts until 13 April 2018. From…

“A moving symbol of cooperation and humanity” – COAL review
Arts
203 views
Arts
203 views

“A moving symbol of cooperation and humanity” – COAL review

William Singh - March 31, 2018

“This is not a show. It’s something else”, we’re told. Gary Clarke’s dance performance of the life and decline of Britain’s mining communities is certainly something else.…

Brighton’s craft beer festival returns in April for third year
Lifestyle
210 views
Lifestyle
210 views

Brighton’s craft beer festival returns in April for third year

Louisa Streeting - March 28, 2018

Brighton will become the hub of craft beer in more than a dozen pubs from April 27-29. The Brighton Tap Takeover returns for a third year bringing…

Young blood promotes brain regeneration
Science
147 views
Science
147 views

Young blood promotes brain regeneration

Nikolaos Manesis - March 28, 2018

On the "growing old is natural" vs "it should be medically reversed" debate, vampires have crossed the picket line from the get-go and scientists have just proven…

The educational psychology of children with autism
Science
170 views
Science
170 views

The educational psychology of children with autism

Nikolaos Manesis - March 28, 2018

The scientific field of educational psychology studies the relationship between learning processes and the individual differences in cognitive development, motivation and intelligence. The majority of children are…